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In Depth
August 8th, 2015
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At Maine River, Dams Removed, Races Begin — And Myth Recalled

Until recently, two dams blocked the 9.5 mile lower stretch of the Penobscot River in Maine. Last month, paddlers from all over the country gathered for a race hosted by the Penebscot Nation celebrating the removal of the dams.

History
August 8th, 2015

The Beatles At Shea: A Sports Stadium Revolution

Fifty years ago at Shea Stadium in New York, the Beatles set a record: 55,600 fans packed the home of the Mets to see the Fab Four in concert. It was the largest crowd in concert history and forever changed the relationship between the music business and sports stadiums.

Featured Book
August 1st, 2015

‘Mashi’ Chronicles Journey of Japan’s First MLB Player

The first Major League Baseball player from Japan was a 20-year-old pitcher by the name of Masanori Murakami. The lefty only played two seasons in the MLB, but his journey is the subject of the new book called “Mashi” by Robert Fitts. Murakami, Fitts and translator Yuriko Romer joined Only A Game’s Doug Tribou.

Featured Book
July 25th, 2015

‘Dancing With The Devil’ Details Rio’s Prep For 2016 Olympics

When Rio de Janeiro was awarded the Summer Olympics, Brazilians celebrated. Six years, an economic nosedive and a World Cup later, the country’s residents feel very differently. In her new book “Dancing with the Devil in the City of God,” Brazilian journalist Juliana Barbassa chronicles the change.

In Depth
July 18th, 2015

15 Years Later: Revisiting The Stadium Staple ‘Who Let The Dogs Out’

The Baha Men’s “Who Let the Dogs Out” was more than a hit song, Sports Illustrated’s Ben Reiter argues. It also changed the relationship between sports and the music industry. Fifteen years after the song’s release, Reiter joins Bill Littlefield to make his case.

Featured Book
July 11th, 2015

‘Bulls Before Breakfast’ Recaps 12 Years — And Counting — Of Running With The Bulls

Peter Milligan has run with the bulls in Pamplona, Spain, for the last 12 years. In his new book “Bulls Before Breakfast,” Milligan explains why he keeps going back year after year.

Feature
July 11th, 2015

25 Years After ’90 MLB All-Star Game, Greg And Gregg Olson Reconnect

Pitcher Gregg Olson reached his first and only All-Star Game in 1990. And so did catcher Greg Olson. They haven’t spoken since. On the 25th anniversary of that game, Bill Littlefield got Greg and Gregg on the phone together to remember the coincidence — and to find out what happens to all those baseball cards that get mailed to the wrong Olson.

Feature
July 11th, 2015
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Latino Players Blurred MLB’s Color Line Before Robinson’s Debut

Our colleagues at NPR’s program Latino USA have produced an episode devoted to Latin America’s influence on the game of baseball. We present their story of how Latin American players blurred baseball’s color line before Jackie Robinson ended segregation in big leagues.

In Depth
July 4th, 2015

Has The Wrong Coolidge Been Added To The Nats’ Presidents Race?

Calvin Coolidge is joining the Presidents Race, the mascot competition held during Washington Nationals home games. Coolidge was in office the last time a club from D.C. won the World Series. Even so, Ben Freed of the Washingtonian thinks a different Coolidge should be have gotten the call.

Featured Book
June 27th, 2015

‘Great Men Die Twice’ Revisits The Writing Of Mark Kram

Mark Kram was a legendary sports writer for Sports Illustrated in the 1960s and ’70s. His exit from S.I. caused problems for his son Mark Kram, Jr., who had the name first and also became a sports writer. Kram, Jr. edited the new collection of his father’s work titled “Great Men Die Twice” and joins Bill Littlefield.

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