Michael Wacha is on of many talented rookie pitchers on the St. Louis Cardinals. (Matt Slocum/AP)

Michael Wacha’s postseason success spawned some creative milkshake ideas . (Matt Slocum/AP)

Doug Tribou’s story two weeks ago brought up the phenomenon of recreated baseball games, the radio broadcasts during which an announcer would read about what had happened on a ticker and then tell the audience it was a sunny day in a city where the announcer wasn’t.

Philip Booth was reminded of his days during the ’70’s at KTEP, the college station at the University of Texas at El Paso where student broadcasters recreated the road games of the minor league El Paso Diablos, using, among other props, a 10 inch reel of tape featuring stadium noises.

Charlie Pierce and I recently discussed the honoring of tennis player Andy Murray, recipient of the Order of the British Empire. I wondered whether we should start calling him “Sir Andy.” A listener named Martha didn’t think that was funny. “I learned in childhood that an OBE is different from a Knighthood,” she wrote. “Has that changed?”

Brian O’Neill also responded to that conversation by e-mailing, “Murray will have a hell of a time playing in full medieval outfit.”

Susan Magoon, who hears the program on WBUR, writes that she is reminded of our show by a line from a 2006 New York Times story by David Foster Wallace: “Beauty is not the goal of competitive sports, but high-level sports are a prime venue for the expression of human beauty.”

My conversation two weeks ago with Daniel Gilbert about his new book, Expanding the Strike Zone: Baseball in the Age of Free Agency provoked David Warren to post on our Facebook page: “It is sad that a union of wealthy ballplayers succeeds while unions of working people fail. However, it is how things often work in my beloved country.”

In our story about the success St. Louis Cardinals rookie pitcher Michael Wacha enjoyed during most of the recently concluded postseason, Wacha mentioned that a restaurant in St. Louis had named a milkshake after him. We invited you to suggest milkshakes that could be invented to honor various other players, and several of you responded.

Barry Goodman, evidently not a fan of Alex Rodriguez of the Yankees, suggested the A-Rod, which would include “diced ham, whole nuts, and a squirt of human growth hormone…best served with an order of crow.”

Barry Duncan, a WBUR listener, sent in several pages of palindromes he’d written after the World Series. My favorite is:

“I, Papi.”

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