Three weeks ago, the program featured a story by Stephen Nessen titled “African American Surfers Challenge Stereotypes.” Among the responses by that story was this comment by Candacey Doris: “As far as the media is concerned, we pull a Wicked Witch if we touch water.”

My visit a few weeks ago with retired thoroughbred Zippy Chippy, loser of 100 races, winner of none, provoked Louise Coleman, whose organization rescues retired racing greyhounds, to post on our Facebook page as follows: “Somebody must love Zippy Chippy.” The people at Old Friends at Cabin Creek in Greenfield Center, New York, certainly do love Zippy.

Sterling Cone, who describes herself as “an avid fan of Only A Game in Illinois,” weighed in after hearing our story on the NFL’s settlement of the lawsuit brought by 4500 former players. “This is an outrage,” Ms. Cone wrote. “The NFL got off WAY too easy.”

In response to the same story, Dr. David Warren e-mailed to say, “I have sympathy for those unfortunate women who allow their children to play football, believing that they will not be injured. Pinky promise or Goodell promise, if you play football, you will get hurt.”

Several weeks ago Charlie Pierce and I discussed the call for a boycott of the Winter Olympic Games in Russia based on that country’s prohibition of so-called gay propaganda. That discussion moved Larry Gluckman to write, “I was on the team [as a rowing coach] in 1980, when President Carter forced the U.S. team to boycott the games in Moscow. Instead of having the team express our outrage over the invasion of Afghanistan, the team was an absent after thought, and, sure enough, in 1984 the Soviet Bloc boycotted the L.A. Games. Sending our athletes to Russia to be asked questions about these issues is a bigger threat to Russia than staying home. Oh, by the way, what country has been mired in Afghanistan for the last 10-plus years? So I guess the boycott was a success in 1980.”

Two weeks ago I spoke with Grantland writer Zach Lowe regarding his proposal to cut eight minutes from NBA games. That discussion was widely circulated and generated lots of comments, including this facebook post by Brian O’Neill: “Give each team 100 points and play five minutes.”

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