Last week’s program featured a story about South Lawrence 5th Grade Academy in Massachusetts. Students in the program, which is based on research demonstrating that learning is enhanced by exercise, have an extended day that includes three scheduled periods of sports, dance, or stepping as well as increased time for academics. Among the comments posted under that story was this one from INGE: “My hope for this excellent new vision in curricula is that it may permeate all American schools.” Pete in Concord wrote, “Thank goodness for this article. Way to go, Only A Game.”

My discussion with Tim Crothers, the author of The Queen of Katwe, also provoked numerous comments. The book concerns Phiona Mutesi, a young woman from a slum in Uganda who’s ascending toward the title of Chess Grandmaster. Several listeners appreciated the story and video we posted on the website, but Roger Wallace, who hears the program on Vermont Public Radio, had a question. “Your story ended with discussion of Phiona Mutesi’s hope of being able to support her impoverished family through sponsorships. The author and publisher will earn income from The Queen of Katwe. Are they committed to sharing their revenue with this amazing young woman whose story they are profiting from? Clearly Ms. Mutesi has worked the hardest to make the creation of this book possible.”

In response to my commentary about Lance Armstrong posted on our Facebook page this week, Bill Rigero replied: “There is greater valor in trying and failing honestly than in cheating and winning. He lied and gave false hope. He is a disgrace.”

Dr. David Warren feels otherwise. In response to my interview last week with Bonnie D. Ford regarding the 11 former Armstrong teammates who acknowledged his transgressions and their own, he wrote: “Do you convict a murderer without a weapon or a body? I believe the guilt lies with Armstrong’s accusers.”

Robert Kendrick of Clemson, South Carolina, emailed to take issue with Charlie Pierce’s characterization of the various anti-doping agencies as motivated by financial gain. “The doping champions, the team directors, and the shady doctors are the ones who reaped the gains of the use of performance-enhancing drugs,” he wrote. “I would like to see Mr. Pierce sit down in a room of former elite amateurs and former pros who didn’t dope and lost their dreams to the Armstrong generation of dopers. How would he defend his “trophy on the wall” rhetoric to them?”

Let us know what you think. You can leave a comment on the listener line at 617-353-1860. You can also find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.