Former Major League pitcher Roger Clemens leaves federal court in Washington, Thursday after the judge declared a mistrial after prosecutors showed jurors evidence that the judge had ruled out of bounds. (AP)

Former Major League pitcher Roger Clemens leaves federal court in Washington Thursday. The judge declared a mistrial after prosecutors showed jurors evidence that the judge had ruled out of bounds. (AP)

Roger Clemens’ perjury trial was expected to run for several weeks. However, the trial came to an abrupt end Thursday when Judge Reggie Walton declared a mistrial as a result of the prosecution’s use of inadmissible evidence. Shira Springer covered the trial for The Boston Globe. Bill Littlefield talks with Springer about the details of Judge Walton’s decision and the future of this controversial trial.

Although Judge Walton was overtly critical of the prosecution, repeatedly scolding and chastising attorney Steven Durham,  Springer mentions that the judge was hesitant about calling the trial off.  When asked to describe the scene of the courtroom during Walton’s announcement Springer recalled, “You could see that Judge Walton really didn’t want to declare it.”

After a 45-minute discussion with a colleague, Walton returned to the courtroom.  ”He had this crestfallen look,” Springer explained,  ”He was shaking his head when he got up to the bench.”

Judge Walton is not alone in his feelings of frustration.  Some American tax payers are fuming about the fact that their money has gone to waste. Springer expects that the United States government will continue to spend money on Clemens’ prosecution. “This was a massive, massive effort by the government, and I think they’re in too deep to give up now.”

Clemens himself may also be hoping that the case goes on, for, as Springer points out, “[He] has been waiting for an opportunity to tell his side of the story.”